OUR COMMON GROUND           with Janice Graham

LIVE Saturdays :: 10 pm ET

The 21ST OUR COMMON GROUND ANNUAL KWANZAA Teach-IN and Celebration l December 22, 2012

The 21ST OUR COMMON GROUND ANNUAL KWANZAA Teach-IN

10 pm ET 
LIVE and CALL-IN
Open Chatroom for Discussion



Learn about the Holiday with discussion of its relevancy throughout the year for enlightened community development and Black nation building. How do we strengthen our love for each other, in our families and in our community ? Commit to our well-being and to our future as a people on this planet?

How do we lend the celebration and the principles of Kwanzaa into our live all year long? 

This year lauds the 34th Anniversary of African-Americans and our Brothers and Sisters around the world, celebrating this holiday.

May You and the World be filled with Divine purpose and a renewed heart for Peace and Spiritual Prosperity; A Year Filled with “Enough” and the Spirit of the true meanings of the N’Guzo Saba and the Challenge of Your Revolutionary Self to Change the World where needed.

ABOUT KWANZAA

Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday which celebrates family, community and culture. Celebrated from 26 December thru 1 January, its origins are in the first harvest celebrations of Africa from which it takes its name. The name Kwanzaa is derived from the phrase "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first fruits" in Swahili, a Pan-African language which is the most widely spoken African language.

Kwanzaa is a 7 day festival celebrating the African American people, their culture and their history. It is a time of celebration, community gathering, and reflection. A time of endings and beginnings. Kwanzaa begins on December 26th and continues until New Years Day, January 1st.

The first-fruits celebrations are recorded in African history as far back as ancient Egypt and Nubia and appear in ancient and modern times in other classical African civilizations such as Ashantiland and Yorubaland. These celebrations are also found in ancient and modern times among societies as large as empires (the Zulu or kingdoms (Swaziland) or smaller societies and groups like the Matabele, Thonga and Lovedu, all of southeastern Africa.

Kwanzaa builds on the five fundamental activities of Continental African "first fruit" celebrations: ingathering; reverence; commemoration; recommitment; and celebration.

Reaffirming and Restoring Culture

Kwanzaa was created to reaffirm and restore our rootedness in African culture. It is, therefore, an expression of recovery and reconstruction of African culture which was being conducted in the general context of the Black Liberation Movement of the '60's and in the specific context of The Organization Us, the founding organization of Kwanzaa and the authoritative keeper of its tradition. Secondly, Kwanzaa was created to serve as a regular communal celebration to reaffirm and reinforce the bonds between us as a people. It was designed to be an ingathering to strengthen community and reaffirm common identity, purpose and direction as a people and a world community.

Thirdly, Kwanzaa was created to introduce and reinforce the Nguzo Saba (the Seven Principles.) These seven communitarian African values are: Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity), and Imani (Faith).

This stress on the Nguzo Saba was at the same time an emphasis on the importance of African communitarian values in general, which stress family, community and culture and speak to the best of what it means to be African and human in the fullest sense. And Kwanzaa was conceived as a fundamental and important way to introduce and reinforce these values and cultivate appreciation for them.

It is a time for family, community and friendship

- a time of in gathering of the people to reaffirm the bonds between them;
- a time of special reverence for the creator and creation in thanks and respect for the blessings, bountifulness and beauty of creation;
- a time for commemoration of the past in pursuit of its lessons and in honor of its models of human excellence, our ancestors;
- a time of recommitment to our highest cultural ideals in our ongoing effort to always bring forth the best of African cultural thought and practice; and
- a time for celebration of the Good, the good of life and of existence itself, the good of family, community and culture, the good of the awesome and the ordinary, in a word the good of the divine, natural and social.

Kwanzaa was created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, professor of Africana Studies at California State University, Long Beach, author and scholar-activist who stresses the indispensable need to preserve, continually revitalize and promote African American culture.

Finally, it is important to note Kwanzaa is a cultural holiday, not a religious one, thus available to and practiced by Africans of all religious faiths who come together based on the rich, ancient and varied common ground of their "Africanness".

The N’GUZO SABA
(The Seven Principles)


Day 1
Umoja (Unity)
To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.


Day 2
Kujichagulia (Self-Determination)
To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves.


Day 3
Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)
To build and maintain our community together and make our brother's and sister's problems our problems and to solve them together.


Day 4
Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics)
To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and to profit from them together.


Day 5
Nia (Purpose)
To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.


Day 6
Kuumba (Creativity)
To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.


Day 7
Imani (Faith)
To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.


THE KWANZAA FEAST OR KARAMU 

The Kwanzaa Karumu is traditionally held on December 31st (participants celebrating New Year's Eve, should plan their Karamu early in the evening). It is a very special event as it is the one Kwanzaa event that brings us closer to our African roots. The Karamu is a communal and cooperative effort. Ceremonies and cultural expressions are highly encouraged. It is important to decorate the place where the Karamu will be held, (e.g., home, community center, church) in an African motif that utilizes black, red, and green color scheme. A large Kwanzaa setting should dominate the room where the karamu will take place. A large Mkeka should be placed in the center of the floor where the food should be placed creatively and made accessible to all for self-service. Prior to and during the feast, an informative and entertaining program should be presented. Traditionally, the program involved welcoming, remembering, reassessment, re-commitment and rejoicing, concluded by a farewell statement and a call for greater unity.

(All information here and used in the broadcast is formulated from the Official Kwanzaa documentation provided by Dr. Maulauna Karenga, the originator of the holiday)

OUR COMMON GROUND with Janice Graham

"Speaking Truth to Power and Ourselves"

BROADCASTING BRAVE BOLD BLACK

Community Forum: http://www.ourcommonground-talk.ning.com/

Twitter: @JaniceOCG #TalkthatMatters

Blogging with OCG: http://ww.ourcommongroundtalk.wordpress.com/

Listen LIVE from any internet connection.

Tags: African, American, Kwanzaa, community, empowerment, holiday

Views: 22

Reply to This

Latest Activity

Events

© 2017   Created by Janice.   Powered by

Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Speaking Truth to POWER and OURSELVES